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Note of meeting of the International Maritime Organization Maritime Safety Committee IMO MSC100

Posted By Kim Fisher, 11 December 2018

Note of meeting of the International Maritime Organization Maritime Safety Committee IMO MSC100 – 3 to 7 December 2018

by Kim Fisher


This was a 5 day meeting of the Maritime Safety Committee under the chairmanship of Mr Bradley Groves (Australia) because the previous meeting this year had been an 8 day meeting in June. Since this was the 100th meeting, and also coinciding with the 70th anniversary of IMO, the opportunity was taken to hold some special events. A seminar was held on the first afternoon and Her Royal Highness Princes Anne was invited to address the meeting on the Wednesday,

The seminar dealt with the technology progression of maritime autonomous ships, the human element and smart marine ecosystems. Some impressive film was shown of a ferry making a totally autonomous voyage, berth to berth. These special events together with a long report from Ukraine on the issue of the capture by Russian forces of Ukrainian naval vessels somewhat restricted the time available for the meeting which consequently became rather rushed.

The substantive issue at the meeting concerned a regulatory scoping exercise for the use of Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS). The previous meeting had set up a correspondence group to move the work forward and a report was available which showed just how complex the issue was. A Working Group at the meeting produced a simplified report and the work will now continue as a web based exercise for the next meeting. Since there is only one MSC meeting next year, a special 5 day intersessional meeting has been arranged for later in the year.

Another Working Group discussed the issue of safety measures for non-SOLAS ships operating in polar waters as an extension to the Polar Code but was not able to make much progress.

Much of the rest of the meeting concerned ship construction standards. New work items were agreed for the use of emergency personal radio devices in multiple casualty situations and for a revision of ECDIS guidelines for good practice.

At the end of the meeting the retirement was announced of Jo Angelo of the USA.

The next meeting of MSC is scheduled to take place from 5 to 14 June 2019. The intersessional meeting on MASS is scheduled to take place from 2 to 6 September 2019. A meeting of the subcommittee on navigation, communication, search and rescue (NCSR) is scheduled for 14 to 25 January 2019.



Tags:  IMO  International Maritime Organization  maritime  safety 

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Securing Positioning, Navigation & Timing: 14 June 2018 Event Report

Posted By John Pottle, 21 June 2018

The recently published Blackett report “Satellite-Derived Time and Position: A Study of Critical Dependencies” concludes “we must take steps to increase the resilience of our critical services in the event of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) disruption, including by “adopting potential back-up systems where necessary”.

Implementation of the Blackett recommendations is being overseen by a UK Cabinet Office Blackett Review Implementation Team (BRIG). The technical aspects of implementing the recommendations are being led by a Positioning, Navigation and Timing Technical Group (PNTTG), reporting to the BRIG.

Three organisations represented on PNTTG – Innovate UK Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN), Royal Institute of Navigation (RIN) and The General Lighthouse Authorities – hosted a seminar on 14 June 2018 to review user needs and the status of two possible RF back-up options to GNSS mentioned in the London Economics report on the economic impact of a GNSS disruption.

The event attracted strong interest, with more than 100 delegates, including representation from user communities requiring assured and accurate position or time. Presenter organisations included UK Space Agency, RIN, Spirent, Imperial College Institute for Security Science and Technology, Ursanav and Orolia. Nick Lambert of NLA International facilitated and chaired the event.

The status of two possible RF back-up systems was presented and discussed: enhanced Loran (eLoran) by Chuck Schue, CEO Ursanav, and Satellite Time and Location (STL) by John Fischer, CTO Orolia. Orolia also demonstrated a static STL system as a back-up to GNSS, generating considerable interest amongst delegates.

STL, which is operational and undergoing user trials and evaluation at present, uses the existing Iridium global satellite constellation’s paging channel to enable a positioning and timing capability on a global basis. Power levels are 1000x (30dB) higher than GNSS, meaning that use indoors becomes possible. STL is currently being evaluated for provision of precise time to financial and government institutions in USA, UK, Italy and Japan. The system uses a narrow-band signal just above the GNSS L-band frequencies. As the signals are encrypted it is practically impossible to spoof STL. The higher power level also offers potential resiliency advantages to GNSS.

eLoran is a ground-based system for time and position, operating in internationally protected frequency bands. The combination of high power and low frequency enables wider coverage than GNSS including indoors and even limited capability under water. eLoran stations are operational to enable precise time in USA (East Coast) and UK. Positioning from eLoran would require additional stations to be made live, noting however that each ground station offers very broad geographic coverage. As well as the USA and UK, other regions offering or considering eLoran type services include Russia, Asia (4 countries including China), Middle East (3 countries) and Australia.

As well as the possibility to consider back-up systems to GNSS on a discrete basis, Orolia and STL shared a white paper on the benefits of an holistic approach to resilient GNSS. The link is provided below.

The seminar concluded by considering some key questions, including how to set up a single UK point of contact for industry and users to increase awareness, share insights and knowledge, and develop a roadmap towards standards and accreditation for resilient systems. This work is being further considered by the organisers, who will report to the next BRIG and PNTTG meetings. Comments and views are invited, please contact RIN or KTN.

 

Links to referenced documents:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/619544/17.3254_Economic_impact_to_UK_of_a_disruption_to_GNSS_-_Full_Report.pdf

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/676675/satellite-derived-time-and-position-blackett-review.pdf

https://spectracom.com/sites/default/files/document-files/Holistic-Approach-to-Trusted-Resilient-PNT.pdf

Tags:  GNSS  Navigation  Resilience  Safety  Trinity House 

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Note of meeting of the IMO Maritime Safety Committee MSC99 – 16 to 25 May 2018

Posted By Administration, 05 June 2018

Note of meeting of the IMO Maritime Safety Committee MSC99 – 16 to 25 May 2018

Author: Kim Fisher

This was an 8 day meeting of the Maritime Safety Committee under the chairmanship of Mr Bradley Groves (Australia). The Maritime Safety Committee meets three times in a two year cycle nominally for 5 days but is permitted a longer meeting when the period between meetings exceeds 6 months.

A substantive issue at the meeting concerned a regulatory scoping exercise for the use of Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS). This was new work which was progressed in a Working Group. A framework was developed including the aim and objective, the preliminary definition of MASS and degrees of autonomy, the list of mandatory regulations to be considered and the applicability in terms of type and size of ships. This will be further developed by a correspondence group for the next meeting.

A further Working Group discussed the issue of safety measures for non-SOLAS ships operating in polar waters as an extension to the Polar Code. This proved to be a difficult topic and will be further discussed at the next meeting. Meanwhile the Sub-committee on Ship Design and Construction (SDC) was tasked with developing recommendatory safety measures for fishing vessels over 24 m in length and pleasure yachts over 300 gross tonnage.

Limited changes to Chapter IV (Radiocommunications) of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) to replace references to “Inmarsat” by “recognized mobile satellite service” were adopted to enter into force on 1 January 2020. This facilitates the introduction of other satellite operators to provide Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) services. The Iridium system had been proposed for recognition and after some debate this was agreed. Further work on its implementation will be carried out by the International Maritime Satellite Organization (IMSO). An initial application for the BeiDou messaging service to be recognised as a further service was accepted.

New work items were agreed for the Japanese Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) to be considered as a future component of the World-Wide Radionavigation System (WWRNS) and for a revision of the guidelines for Vessel Traffic Services.

The workload of the Sub-committee on Navigation Communications and Search and Rescue (NCSR) was discussed as it has been proving difficult to achieve all the work. This resulted in a proposal to extend the length of the meeting from 5 to 8 days for the next two years.

The next meeting of MSC is scheduled to take place from 3 to 7 December 2018. A meeting of the Joint IMO/ITU Experts Group is planned for 3 to 7 September 2018 and a meeting of the ICAO/IMO Joint working group is planned for 17 to 21 September 2018. The meeting of the IMO/IHO Harmonization Group on Data Modelling (HGDM) is planned for 29 October to 2 November 2018. A meeting of NCSR is planned for 16 to 25 January 2019.

Tags:  IMO  Maritime  Report  Safety 

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